Offshoots #1: Enter the Carrot Premiere Edition

Offshoots #1: Enter the Carrot Premiere Edition is our inaugural Potato Revolution Creative Studios publication.

This collection of comics, stories and more represents ten years of Potato Revolution. Printed in crisp black-and-white across 48 pages, the book features Mike and Liam, Wazu the streetfighting lemur, and even an excerpt from the well-loved stream-of-consciousness online experiment that was Trunkton and the Adventures Thereof.

You will also find some of our favourite sketchbook work from special guest artist-in-residence Nikki Flux!

This exclusive book is a celebration of all things Potato Revolution – from humble beginnings as an amateur podcast to the multimedia production machine we always hoped it could be – and beyond!

We are now accepting pre-orders.

Price: AU$6 (includes P&P).

Reserve your copy through our Patreon, or send an expression of interest through Instagram or Facebook.

Enter the Carrot Episode 01 – A Bum Deal

The adventure begins. Mike and Liam discover a vagrant living in their hallway cupboard who charges them with a quest to find the Sacred Cookie.

At last! The first nail-biting instalment of the all-new Mike + Liam limited podcast series is now available to download here and everywhere you find podcasts!

Starring Andy and Mog with Rhysy and Mr Rupert Sharp.

Find full credits here and more Mike + Liam adventures in their very own weekly comic!

Support the show by telling your weird friends about Enter the Carrot and don’t forget to Like, Share and Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.

Want to do more? Find out how with our Patreon.

Space Junk: remixed / re-used / recycled

Space Junk is a surreal trip through outer space and exists as a companion piece to The Quest Inn at the Centre of the Universe.

The original nine episodes released between August-September 2018 have been re-purposed and presented on Youtube as a complete package.

Teaser trailer

The vacuum of space is a cold and lonely place…

Forgotten and alone, your derelict ship drifts aimlessly in the darkness. Your only company, and last defence against the maddening silence, is the barely functioning radio receiver. Pressing your ear against the speaker, you listen closely and hope for help to drift your way…

Space Junk is a collection of sketches, stories and music brought to you by the folks behind The Quest Inn at the Centre of the Universe.

Initially set to be only four episodes long, the first half of this series leans heavily into building on lore from the Quest Inn podcast. The Furious Rodent Leader sketches were scripted and performed by Mog in a second session.

Episode 5: Banana Peel cover art.

Space Junk2 (episodes 5-9) comprises additional improvisations with Charlie Sturgeon alongside scripted material written and performed by Mog.

Episodes 1-4 written and performed by Tom Fahey, Indiana Kiely, Mog Thistlethwaite and Beau Windon.

Episodes 5-9 (Space Junk2) written and performed by Tom Fahey, Charlie Sturgeon, Mog Thistlethwaite and Beau Windon.

Original music featured throughout the series was written and performed by Soul Doubt.

Find the full unadulterated podcast episodes here or listen to all of your favourite sketches remixed, re-ordered, and with a visualiser and titles on Youtube.


Space Junk remixed for Youtube

Show your support by liking the video and subscribing to our channel.

Pictures for Sad Children: the rise and fall of John Campbell

Article – by Morgan Thistlethwaite

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The story behind Pictures for Sad Children is contentious. Was the Kickstarter scheme that raised more than USD$50,000 merely a hoodwink to swindle fans, or is John Campbell’s very public fall from grace merely the sum of the facts presented?

I first discovered Campbell’s webcomic in 2012, and like many, I became a little obsessed with it. So drawn in was I by the strip and its absurdist tone that, when I learned that I had five years of content to catch up on, I was like a little kid in a candy store (albeit, a little kid with some kind of ongoing mental condition).

Not unlike many other comics I had discovered, Campbell’s comic was captivating. But unlike those other comics, it was not for its artwork, colours, or even laugh-out-loud humour that I am often so fond of. No, Pictures for Sad Children stood out because it was precisely none of these things.

The characters were little more than stick figures, the colour scheme consisted of grey in a variety of hues, and its humour was far more contemplative and underplayed than, “Ha! That’s a funny one right there.”

Elegant in its minimalism, Campbell’s comic spoke to me (and many others) about depression and anxiety—dual conditions I deal with to varying degrees on a regular basis.

Campbell began the comic in 2007 and after five years, it had made quite an impact. You might even think that there was enough content to publish a printed collection. It turns out, in 2009, that’s exactly what Campbell did and it was met with some success. So much so, that in 2012, Campbell set up a Kickstarter campaign to release the follow-up, Sad Pictures for Children.

Campbell planned to raise USD$8,000 to publish and distribute 2000 copies of the 200-page hardcover collection. The campaign raised USD$51,615 in pledges.

In hindsight, perhaps the way this story ends is not all that surprising.

These are the facts as we know them:

May 26, 2012:

1,073 backers pledged $51,615 to Campbell’s Kickstarter campaign.

September 20, 2012:

Campbell posts this update on Kickstarter stating that they’ve been “pretending to be depressed for profit”.

September 22, 2012:

Campbell retracts prior statement with this one stating that they were “pretending to pretend to be depressed”.

October 25, 2013:

Campbell states that shipping has been delayed due to running out of money.

February 28, 2014:

Campbell posts this update stating that 75% of the Kickstarter rewards were met but no further books will be shipped. There is an accompanying video showing boxes of unsent books being burnt.


Since this update, all content on the website has been removed and any trace of John Campbell has disappeared from the internet.

Following Campbell’s online disappearance, a fellow artist and friend of Campbell was able to retrieve the surviving books (about 100 in total) and distribute them to backers still in need of a delivered product.

For anyone looking for remnants of the webcomic, it may still be out there if you can find it, but as these articles (How to disappear completely from the internet, Book burning, webcomics, and the fate of Pictures for Sad Children) can attest, Campbell has done a pretty good job of removing all traces.

Whatever the real story is here, I think it’s worth looking at the big picture. At the end of the day, John Campbell found success doing something they loved doing. Starting out, it’s easy to play the game your own way with little to no regard for what others might think. Success can come at any moment and if you’re not ready for it (mentally or emotionally), you may just find that you’re not be equipped to deal with it. But then, only you can know this and you won’t really know until it happens.

I guess, just look after yourself and only give what you can live without.